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LL's rights to refuse fixing up? - Landlord Forum thread 354519







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LL's rights to refuse fixing up? by A&M (Arizona) on October 6, 2017 @10:40

                              
After my inspection to decide on renewing my tenant's lease, there are certain damages such as hole in drywall and a hole in ceiling that they asked to have repaired. Can I refuse to do the repairs since we would prefer to fix the ceiling by tearing out the entire ceiling to upgrade it at the same time? If I can refuse to repair, can I have them sign an addendum to acknowledge that they would be okay with the non-repair request? Thank you for any advice given.
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Re: LL's rights to refuse fixing up? by Anonymous on October 6, 2017 @11:35 [ Reply ]
This is a non-issue. Make the repairs. If this is a tenant you're trying to keep, which I assume it is since you're renewing, you don't need to tear out and 'upgrade' a ceiling. Handle something like that between tenants. For now, patch things up.
Re: LL's rights to refuse fixing up? by Garry (Iowa) on October 6, 2017 @11:50 [ Reply ]
Were the holes in the wall and ceiling there before the tenants moved in, or did the tenants or their guests cause them while living there? If the Ts caused them, you can refuse to repair them while the Ts are still living there. If the Ts caused the damage, they can either live with it, or have it repaired at their own expense. If they were there before the T moved in, and you did not repair them then, you should repair the holes now, without causing too much of a disruption to the T, and tear out/upgrade the ceiling after the Ts have moved out.
Re: LL's rights to refuse fixing up? by Pop's on October 6, 2017 @15:00 [ Reply ]
If the T caused the issue then it should be paid by the T. prior to re-instating a new lease. If they give any problems then you may want to re-consider renting to them another year.

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